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General Health And Service Use abstracts and tables:

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1.   Comorbidity In Alzheimer's Disease
2.   Applying Health Locus Of Control And John Henryism Active Coping Theories To Older African American Adults
3.   Measurement Of Use Of Formal Health Care Services

Journal of Mental Health and Aging, Vol. 3, No. 1, 1997

Comorbidity In Alzheimer's Disease 

Ladislav Volicer,MD, PhD

Ann Hurley, DNSc, RN

Abstract:  

 The presence of comorbid conditions complicates both the design and interpretation of clinical trials involving individuals suffering from Alzheimer’s disease. The two main types of comorbidity are (1) random comorbidity, in which Alzheimer’s disease coexists with another disease by chance alone, and (2) epidemiological comorbidity, in which there is a relationship between prevalence of Alzheimer’s disease and other diseases. Random comorbidity affects clinical trials because the other diseases may interfere with making the diagnosis of Alzheimer’s disease, affect the result of therapeutic interventions, or alter the natural course of Alzheimer’s disease.

Clinical trials may control for comorbidity by either evaluating the influence of individual diseases or by using a global index of comorbidity for each experimental subject. A comorbidity index can be computed either on the basis of severity of the most severe condition or by taking into consideration all comorbid conditions. Although there are several methods for computing a comorbidity index, none of them was designed specifically for subjects with Alzheimer’s disease. The use of these methods is complicated because some consider dementia as a comorbid condition and others do not include comorbid conditions that are important for Alzheimer patients. However, the methods are useful as a starting point in designing studies investigating Alzheimer’s disease.

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Journal of Mental Health and Aging, Vol. 7, No. 1, 2001

Applying Health Locus Of Control And John Henryism Active Coping Theories To Older African American Adults

Marvella E. Ford, PhD

Deanna Hill, MPH

Ameera Butler, BS

Suzanne Havstad, MA

Abstract:  

This brief article focuses on issues related to the internal consistency or reliability of the Multidimensional Health Locus of Control scale and the John Henryism Active Coping scale among older African American adults. Although these two mental health constructs grew from disparate theoretical frameworks, both are related to the likelihood of involvement in health promotion programs. Policy decisions regarding the development of these programs should reflect research conducted using culturally appropriate measurement instruments. While progress has been made in assessing the psychometric properties of these scales among older Africans Americans, much work remains. These two constructs need to be tested in large samples of older African American adults, and within rather than across racial groups. Future studies can assess the equivalence of these constructs across different age, gender, socieconomic status and ethnic groups, and among individuals from different geographic locations.

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Journal of Mental Health and Aging, Vol. 3, No. 1,1997

Measurement Of Use Of Formal Health Care Services

Jennie Jacobs Kronenfeld, PhD

Abstract:  

  This paper identifies and describes measures of health service use and their applicability for assessing elderly persons with dementing illness and/or communication disorder. Dimensions and types of health service utilization are first discussed, followed by a discussion of special issues of validity as they apply to this population. A variety of approaches are examined, including personal interviews, proxy reports, and use of administrative and health plan records.

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