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Year 1985

ARTICLES:

  1. Cohen, C., Teresi, J., Holmes, D. (1985) Social Networks, stress, adaptation, and health. Research on Aging, Vol. 7, No. 3, 409-431

    Abstract:

    In this study, utilizing 19 social network variables and 3 outcome measures (need fulfillment, psychological symptoms, and physical symptoms), we follow elderly residents of mid-Manhattan hotels for one year. The findings indicate that social networks exert a direct effect on reducing subsequent symptoms and enhancing ability to meet needs. Moreover, social networks trigger a buffering response to stressors in that their ability to reduce symptoms and to promote need fulfillment was greatest among high-stress individuals.


  2. Cohen, C., Teresi, J., Holmes, D. (1985) Social Networks, Stress, and Physical Health: A Longitudinal Study of an Inner-City Elderly Population. Journal of Gerontology, Vol. 40, No. 4, pp. 478-486.

    Abstract:

    Research examining the relationship between social networks, stress, and physical symptoms has been limited by rudimentary network measures and the lack of longitudinal data. Using 19 network variables, the authors followed 133 elderly residents of med-Manhattan hotels for 1 year. The findings indicated that social networks exert a direct effect on reducing subsequent physical symptoms. Moreover, social networks also act to reduce symptoms by buffering the effect of increased levels of stress. Of clinical relevance was the finding that combining knowledge of patients' social networks with their current health status predicts their future health status with an exceeding high degree of certainty. Consequently, intervention to reinforce a network can be as clinically significant as implementing a medical procedure.
  3. Cohen, C., Teresi, J., Holmes, D. (1985) Social Networks and adaptation. The Gerontological Society of America . Vol. 25, No. 3, pp. 297-304.  

    Abstract:

    Previous research examining the relationship between social networks and adaptation has been limited by rudimentary measures of social interaction and a lack of longitudinal data. Utilizing 19 network variables, the authors followed 133 elderly residents of mid-Manhattan hotels for one year. The findings confirmed the direct and buffering effects of social networks.  Of clinical relevance was the non-linearity of the network effect- depending on a person's stress level, different network dimensions must be emphasized and strengthened .


 

PRESENTATIONS AT SCIENTIFIC MEETINGS:

  1. Holmes, D. (1985). Consumer potential of older Americans. Presented at the Annual Meeting of the Marketing Research Association of American, New York City.
  2. Teresi, J. (1985, June). Characteristics of mentally and physically impaired elderly in relation to family burden and decision to institutionalize. Paper Presented at Columbia University Seminar on Alzheimer's Disease.
  3. Teresi, J. & Holmes, D. (1985). A comparison of the validity of scales developed using internal consistency, criterion referenced and latent trait approaches to scale construction. Paper Presented at the Annual Meeting of the American Educational Research Association, Chicago, Illinois.