Home                          

 

 

Title:  Patient-Reported Outcomes Measurement Information System (PROMIS)

Specific Characteristics:                   June 2008 Summit

Key Staff:

·         David Cella, PhD, PI of the Statistical Coordinating Center to PROMIS

·         Jeanne Teresi, EdD. PhD, Consultant to the SCC

Funding Source: National Institutes of Health-NIH Roadmap for Medical Research Initiative

Objective:  May 2007 Summit

This roadmap project endeavors to provide an infrastructure for clinicians and researchers by establishing item banks and Computerized Adaptive Testing (CAT) methodology to evaluate patient-reported outcomes in clinical research involving diverse populations and a variety of chronic diseases.  This item bank will be publicly available to researchers and it will continue to evolve as it is modified and updated.   

 

 

 

    

 

Title:   Validation of Patient-Reported Outcomes Measurement Information System (PROMIS) in Diverse Cancer Populations.

Specific Characteristics:

Key Staff:

·         Arnold Potosky, MD, Georgetown University Medical Center

·         Jeanne Teresi, EdD, PhD, PI, Methods and Statistics

Summary: 

This proposal’s four specific aims will evaluate the usefulness of PROMIS item banks in diverse cancer patient populations and in clinical settings to: (1) Assess differences in the measurement properties of selected PROMIS item banks using IRT-based methods across age and racial-ethnic groups; (2) Compare PROMIS measures versus legacy instruments to detect differences in patient-reported outcomes for selected domains across age, race-ethnicity, and cancer clinical sub-groups; (3) Assess the association of selected PROMIS item banks with clinical events and disease/treatment states  in cancer patients treated in diverse health care settings; (4) Assess the responsiveness of selected PROMIS domains to changes in clinical status among groups versus individual cancer patients.

  

 

Title:   Treating Both Hypertension and Colon Cancer Prevention in Community Based Research

Funding:  Centers for Disease Control

PI:   Scott Braithwaite, MD, MS, with Joseph Ravenell, MD, MS, NYU School of Medicine

Subcontract PI:   Jeanne Teresi, EdD, PhD

Primary Aim:  This is a comparative effectiveness study. This project adds a third arm to previously funded studies that examine a hypertension counseling intervention and a colon cancer navigation intervention in African American men aged >50.

Recruitment occurs at churches and barber shops. The additional third arm will receive both the hypertension and colon cancer screening interventions.

   

 

Title:   Health Disparities Core (COHD) in NOCEMHD

Funding:  National Institute on Minority Health and Health Disparities

PI:   Jose Luchsinger, MD, MPH, Columbia University Medical Center

Project Leader: Bruce Link, PhD, NY State Psychiatric Institute/ Dana March, PhD, Mailman School of Public Health
Subcontract PI: Jeanne Teresi, EdD, PhD

 Specific Aim 1:   To examine in NOMEM cross-sectional analyses the respective contributions of Health Disparity Environmental Factors (HDEF) at the national, state, city, neighborhood, and individual levels to proximal behavioral and biological risk and protective factors for diabetes and depression in a midlife Hispanic population.

 Specific Aim 2:   To examine how HDEF at the national, state, city, neighborhood, and individual levels modify the response to the community-based interventions in NOCHOP, NOMA-CERED, and COACH (NYU).

   

 

Title:  Model Screening and Intervention Program for Early Dementia in Primary Care

Specific Characteristics:

Key Staff:

·        Ellen Grober, PhD, Albert Einstein College of   Medicine and Montefiore Medical Center

·         Jeanne Teresi, EdD. PhD, ( Statistical Coordinating Center subcontract)

Funding Source:  National Institute on Aging

Objective:  

Aim 1: Improve the recognition of early dementia in primary care by providing PCPs with training and the results of screening tests

Aim 2: Improve the discrimination of AD from vascular and other dementias

Aim 3: Increase the proportion of patients with dementia who receive appropriate treatment by implementing a system of care for early dementia

   

 

Title:  Staff Training in Resident-to-Resident Elder Mistreatment

Specific Characteristics:

Key Staff: 

·         Jeanne Teresi, EdD. PhD, PI

Subcontract Associates:

·        Terry Fulmer, RN, Ph.D., FAAN, Dean, NYU School of Nursing ,

·        Mark Lachs, M.D., Weill Cornell Medical College

·        Karl Pillemer, Ph.D., Weill Cornell Medical College

·        Joy Solomon, J.D., Weinberg Center on Elder Abuse

Funding Source:  New York State Department of Health Dementia Grant

Objective:

Working with the top experts in elder mistreatment, including a leading geriatrician at Weill Cornell Medical College and an elder abuse research pioneer at NYU, this project addresses the problem of violence and aggression committed by nursing home residents that is directed toward other residents. A three module training program for staff will be developed that enhances identification and intervention with respect to episodes of resident-to-resident elder mistreatment (R-REM) in long term care facilities. The modules are titled (a) Recognition and Risk Factors; (b) Management of Resident-to-Resident Elder Mistreatment; and (c) Implementation of Best Practices Related to Resident-to-Resident Elder Mistreatment.  The training modules will be evaluated with respect to impact on resident falls, accidents and injuries and on quality of life   

   

 

Title:   Prevalence of Resident to Resident Elder Mistreatment (RREM) in Long Term Care

Specific Characteristics:

Key Staff:

·        Mark Lachs, MD, Weill Cornell Medical College , PI

·        Jeanne Teresi, EdD, PhD, PI Implementation subcontract

Lead Organization: Weill Cornell Medical College

Funding Source:  National Institutes of Health

Summary: 

This research project aims to: (1) refine methodology for identifying cases of resident-to-resident elder mistreatment (RREM) in long-term care facilities using triangulation methodology that derives information from resident, staff, and incident reports; (2) conduct the first systematic prevalence study of RREM in a representative sample of 10 long-term care facilities; and (3) describe the victims and perpetrators of RREM with respect to clinical, functional, and other characteristics and the environmental and situational contexts in which RREM episodes occur. 

   

 

Title:   Physician Documentation of Resident-To-Resident Mistreatment in Residential Care Facilities 

Specific Characteristics:

Key Staff:

·        Mark Lachs, MD, Weill Cornell Medical College, PI

·        Jeanne A. Teresi, EdD, PhD, Mildred Ramirez, Co-PIs  

Funding Source:  National Institutes of Justice

Summary: 

While mistreatment of long term care residents by staff is unconscionable, this proposal asserts that the greatest threat of elder abuse to American nursing home residents comes not from staff, but from other cohabitants in the form of resident-to-resident elder mistreatment (R-REM).  Despite pilot data suggesting R-REM is prevalent, it is both under-studied and under-reported.  Accordingly, the specific aims of this project are to: 1) enhance institutional recognition of R-REM by deriving R-REM information from five different sources, including two added for this project: forensic medical record review, and accident/incident reports. Additionally, a gold standard consensus conference classification is proposed for a random sample of residents; 2) examine the convergence of R-REM reports across the five different methodologies; 3) identify the most accurate mechanism for detecting and reporting R-REM; 4) develop profiles to describe the types of people reported by each different source; 5) investigate the existing policies and procedures for reporting R-REM in each facility; 6) develop institutional guidelines for the reporting of R-REM episodes.

 

Title:  Northern Manhattan Center of Excellence on Minority Health and Health Disparities (CEMHD) at Columbia University (formerly Columbia Center for the Health of Urban Minorities (CHUM))

Specific Characteristics:

PI:   Jose Luchsinger, MD, MPH, Columbia University Medical Center

Subcontract PI:   Jeanne Teresi, EdD, PhD

Funding source: National Center on Minority Health and Health Disparities

Objectives:

The center is aimed at reducing and ultimately eliminating racial and ethnic disparities in health care among Latinos and African Americans. The foci of the three research projects are:

a) Northern Manhattan Diabetes Community Health Worker Project (NOCHOP), Walter Palmas, MD, MS, Columbia School of Medicine

b) Informatics in Diabetes Education and Telemedicine – Cognition (IDEATel-COG), Jose Luchsinger, MD, MPH Columbia University School of Medicine

c) Counseling Older Adults to Control Hypertension (COACH), Olugbenga Ogedegbe, MD, MY School of Medicine

   

 

Title:  Efficacy of Treating Anemia in Heart Failure with a Normal Ejection Fraction on Ventricular Function Exercise Capacity and Health Status

Specific Characteristics:

Key Staff:

·         Mathew Mauer, MD, (PI)

·         Jeanne Teresi, Ed.D., Ph.D. (PI, subcontract)

Lead Organization: Columbia Medical Center

Funding Source: National Institutes of Health

Objective:

This is a randomized, prospective, double blind study of 120 subjects (60 per treatment arm) with 1:1 randomization of patients to subcutaneous erythropoietin or placebo (saline injection) over a 6 month follow-up period. The project aims to evaluate the effect of erythropoietin on left ventricular structure, specifically end diastolic volume (EDV) in order to determine if treating anemia significantly decreases EDV.

   

 

Title:   Claude D. Pepper Older Americans Independence Center (OAIC) Promoting Independence through Pain and Symptom Management  

Specific Characteristics:

Key Staff:

·         Albert Siu, MD, PI, Mount Sinai Medical Center

·         Jeanne Teresi, EdD, PhD, PI, Measurement and Data Management Core

Funding Source:  National Institutes of Aging

Summary: 

The Center bridges geriatrics and palliative care and serve as a model for a new focused area of research within geriatrics. These collaborations are the source for new research projects and junior faculty with interests in geriatrics and palliative care. The OAIC recruits and trains academic leaders, and it supports pilot and exploratory studies. It has established 2 research cores (research design and analysis, measurement and data management) that apply innovative methods not currently in widespread use in aging research but that are highly applicable to aging. The Center brings together a) leadership by senior geriatricians who are long-standing colleagues with a shared track record of successful research and training program building; b) senior faculty with a substantial body of research contributions; and c) promising junior investigators. Our Center's theme has its roots in the deepest traditions of medicine: attention to the primacy of the relief of suffering. Ancient though this priority may be, medical research in general, and geriatric research in particular, are poised to bring modern techniques and knowledge to what is in fact a new area of focus for the OAIC program - the effective amelioration of pain and other symptoms to improve function and promote independence in older adults. 

   

 

Title:   Resource Centers for Minority Aging Research III Administrative Supplement 

Specific Characteristics:

Key Staff:

·         Elisio Stable-Perez , MD, University of California in San Francisco , PI

·         Jeanne Teresi, EdD, PhD, Measurement and Methods consultant

Summary:

Continuation of RCMAR work at a national level, to foster health measurement in diverse populations and mentoring of minority aging research.

   

 

Title:  Faith-based Approaches to Treating Hypertension and Colon Cancer Prevention

Specific Characteristics:

Key Staff:

·         Joseph E. Ravenell, MD, MS, New York University Department of Medicine, PI

·         Jeanne Teresi, EdD, PhD, PI,  Evaluation subcontract

Summary:

 

This project simultaneously evaluates in a randomized controlled trial, the effectiveness of two evidence-based interventions targeted at blood pressure reduction and colorectal cancer screening among Black men in NYC. The long-term goal is to develop a program that could serve as a new nontraditional model of disseminating proven interventions for cardiovascular risk reduction and colorectal cancer prevention in black men nationwide. In translating these proven interventions to community-based settings, community health promotion is linked to the healthcare system. Thus, this program could serve as a new nontraditional model of disseminating proven interventions for cardiovascular risk reduction and colon cancer prevention in black men nationwide - a group that is often underrepresented in traditional clinical practices. The potential for dissemination is high, as there is at least one church in virtually every neighborhood across the United States .  

   

 

Title:  Coordinating Center to the Dementia Special Care Projects 

Specific Characteristics:

Key Staff:

·         D. Holmes, Ph.D., PI/Director

 ·         J. Teresi, Ed.D., Ph.D., Co-Director; National Institute on Aging

 

The National Institute on Aging (NIA) funded a set of collaborative research projects nationally located at ten sites. These projects were designed to examine the nature and effectiveness of special care unit (SCU) care in institutional settings using state-of-the-art research methods.  A common core data set was used across all sites to examine issues such as resident and environmental characteristics, prevalence of dementia, costs of care, and resident outcomes.  According to the NIA, results from these studies have made a significant contribution to current knowledge about the organization and impact of these settings.

   

 

Title:  Informatics, Telemedicine, and Education Demonstration Project

Specific Characteristics:               IdeaTel Home PC

Key Staff:

·         Steve Shea, MD, Principal Investigator

·         Douglas Holmes, PhD, (Principal investigator Coordinating Center )

·         Jeanne Teresi, EdD. PhD, (Co-PI and Statistician of the Coordinating Center)

Lead Organization: Columbia University , College of Physicians and Surgeons, Department of Medicine

Funding Source:  Centers for Medicare and Medicaid services (formerly HCFA)

Objective:  

This randomized controlled trial evaluates medical informatics and telemedicine care for Medicare beneficiaries with diabetes living in underserved urban and rural settings. Participants in the intervention arm each receive a home telemedicine unit, a modified computer with attachments to measure blood pressure and blood glucose.  Each participant is assigned a nurse case manager with whom remote televisits are conducted.  Recommendations are provided by the nurse case managers to the participants’ PCPs.  In addition, the American Diabetes Association created websites (in both English and Spanish) for use specifically with this project. Delivery of telemedicine resulted in positive clinical outcomes, including reduction in blood glucose levels, blood pressure, and lipids.

   

 

Title:  Health Information Technology (HIT) Evaluation

Specific Characteristics          Trainng Session

Key Staff:                                                 

·         Karl Pillemer, Ph.D., PI

·         Jeanne Teresi, Ed.D., Ph.D. (Evaluation subcontract)

Lead Organization: Weill Cornell Medical College

Funding Source: New York State Department of Health

Objective:

The overall purpose of this demonstration project is the implementation and evaluation of a mobile electronic medical records (EMR) system (SigmaCareTM) to help nursing homes in New York State improve care delivery, decrease medical records, and lower health care costs.  The SigmaCareTM system (eHealth Solutions), which allows health care providers to access medical records for every resident at any time, will be put into operation in 24 facilities in New York State. EMRs have the potential to revolutionize care delivery and result in enhanced quality of care in long-term care settings.  

   

 

Title:   New York City Elder Abuse Center (MDT)

Funding Source:  Samuels Foundation/ Health Aging Program

PI:  Mark Lachs, MD, Cornell Medical College

Subcontract PI:  Jeanne Teresi, EdD, PhD

Specific aims:

   

 

Title:   Therapeutic Lifestyle Counseling to Control Hypertension in African American Adults

Funding Source: NIH/ NHLBI- Challenge Grant

PI: Olugbenga Ogedegbe, MD, NYU

Subcontract PI: Jeanne Teresi, EdD, PhD

This project will evaluate the efficacy of a practice-based comprehensive therapeutic lifestyle intervention, delivered through group classes and individual motivational interviewing (MINT-TLC) to African Americans (n=200) with poorly controlled hypertension at 6 months

   

 

Title:   Evaluation of the Senior Advocacy Project (“SAP”)

Funding Source:   The Fan Fox and Leslie R. Samuels   Foundation

PI:   Randye Retkin, Esq,  LegalHealth,   New York Legal Assistance Group            

Subcontract PI:   Mildred Ramirez, PhD

The Senior Advocay Program overall goal is to provide onsite legal services to seniors at the hospitals or community based programs where they receive their medical care. This project is recruiting seniors from the Wright Center. The project aims are to evaluate the impact of the program on the participants’ quality of life and to provide legal services to older people in need of interventions such as housing.

   

 

Title:   The Northern Manhattan Center of Excellence in Comparative Effectiveness Research

PI:   Jose Luchsinger, MD, MPH, Columbia University Medical Center

Subcontract PI:  Jeanne Teresi, EdD, PhD

This Center is a supplement to the previously reviewed Center for the Health of Urban Minorities (CHUM- currently named CEMHD).

Research AIM:   To compare the effectiveness of an existing evidence-based dementia caregiver intervention, the New York University Caregiver Intervention (NYUCI), to Usual Care in the Latino community of Northern Manhattan.

Primary outcomes:  Changes in caregiver depressive symptoms

Secondary outcomes:  Changes in caregiver depression prevalence, changes in quality of life, changes in biomarkers of stress and vascular risk, and a composite score of hospitalizations, death, institutionalization, and unscheduled physician visits.

   

 

Title:   Evaluation of New York State Geriatric Education Centers

Funding Source:   Health Resources and Services Administration (HRSA)

PI:   Judith Howe, PhD, Mount Sinai School of Medicine

Subcontract PI:  Jeanne Teresi, EdD, PhD

 The study consortium includes departments within Brookdale, Columbia University, Hunter College and NYU.

Objective 1:  To improve statewide access to geriatrics training of interdisciplinary health professionals in NY State by using the results of a statewide needs assessment.

Establish content areas for training based on the needs assessment in areas including: a) mental health, b) chronic illness, c) geriatric care management, d) dying/palliative care, e) wellness/prevention, and f) pain management.

Train primary care practitioners in geriatrics and palliative care

Recruit culturally diverse health care professionals

Target training sessions in MUAs and HPSAs

Objective 2:  To develop and disseminate evidence-based curricula relating to the treatment of health problems of the elderly 

Objective 3:  To support the training and re-training of faculty to provide geriatric instruction

Objective 4:  To support the continuing education of health professionals in geriatrics

Objective 5:  To provide students new and expanded clinical training in geriatrics in nursing homes, chronic and acute disease hospitals, ambulatory care centers and senior centers.

   

  

Title: Northern Manhattan Hispanic Caregiver intervention Effectiveness Study (NHiCE)

Funding Source: PCORI

Key Staff:

·         PI - Jose Luchsinger, MD, Columbia University

·         Subcontract PI - Jeanne Teresi, EdD, PhD

Goals: to compare the effectiveness of two dementia caregiver interventions, the New York University Caregiver Intervention, and the translation of the Resources for Enhancing Caregiver’s Health (REACH OUT) in a pragmatic randomized trial of 200 Hispanic relative caregivers of persons with dementia.

Primary Aim: To compare the effectiveness of the NYUCI and REACH OUT in 200 Hispanic caregivers of persons with dementia in New York City in a pragmatic randomized trial. Primary outcomes compared:

  1. Changes in caregiver depressive symptoms, measured with the Geriatric Depression Scale (GDS)
  2. Changes in caregiver burden using the Zarit caregiver burden interview at 6 months

Exploratory Aim #1: Compare the NYUCI and REACH OUT in changes in caregiver  health (measured with the Caregiver Physical health form and the Patient Reported Outcomes Measurement Information System physical health scale) and stress (measured with the Perceived Stress Scale)

Exploratory Aim #2: Examine the predictors (demographics, family position, acculturation, and social support) of acceptance and success of the NYUCI and REACH OUT

   

 

Title: New-York-City Hispanic-dementia-caregiver Research Program (NHiRP)

Funding Source: National Institute of Nursing Research

Key Staff:

·         PI – Jose Luchsinger, MD, Columbia University

·         Subcontract PI - Jeanne Teresi, EdD, PhD

The primary aims are to examine outcomes in an observational phase of the Northern Manhattan Caregiver Intervention Project (NOCIP; see below), create a longitudinal registry of Hispanic relative caregivers of persons with dementia, and develop and evaluate a web-based personal health information management system. An overarching goal is to examine the characteristics of Hispanic caregivers and use this knowledge to design and test technology based interventions.

Overarching goal: To examine the characteristics of Hispanic caregivers and use this knowledge to       design and test technology based interventions.

SA1: To compare caregiver change in depressive symptoms and burden between the Northern Manhattan Caregiver Intervention Project (NOCIP) study arms in a 5-year observational study phase (NOCIP-OS) 1 and 5 years after NOCIP enrollment.

SA2: To examine the interplay by key socio-demographic characteristics, caregiver burden, stress, and depressive symptoms in 300 members from our newly formed register. Key characteristics include sex and family position, employment, acculturation, socioeconomic status (SES), social support, and coping.

SA3: To iteratively develop and refine a web-based Family-HIMS in participation with caregivers enrolled in the NHIRP registry and evaluate the impact of Family-HIMS use on caregivers’ perceptions of ease of use and usefulness and on caregiving outcomes.

   

 

Title: Berman/Reid Mentoring Project

Funding Source: Cornell University Clinical and Translational Science Center

Key Staff:

·         PI – Nathaniel Berman, MD, M. Carrington Reid, MD, Weill-Cornell Medical College

·         Subcontract PI - Jeanne Teresi, EdD, PhD

This study will generate feasibility data for a trial that attempts to reduce symptom burden in high-risk dialysis patients that are not transplant eligible by modifying treatment targets.  The intervention includes reductions in some medications and relaxation of blood pressure targets.

The following interventions will be applied (as applicable):

   

 

Title: Stroke Prevention/Intervention Research Program (NINDS-U54)

Funding Source: National Institute of Neurological Disorders and Stroke

Key Staff:

·         PI – Olugbenga Ogedegbe , MD , NYU School of Medicine

·         Subcontract PI - Jeanne Teresi, EdD, PhD

This project is a consortium of NYU, Columbia University , Visiting Nurse Service of New York and the Research Division of the Hebrew Home at Riverdale.  It includes a stroke prevention/intervention project with the goal of reducing systolic blood pressure and reoccurrence of strokes and TIAs in a minority, low income population and two additional evaluation projects examining factors related to stroke risk.

Objectives of the Center for Stroke Disparities Solutions

  1. To create a consortium that will expand the capacity for conducting implementation research targeted at reducing stroke disparities and stroke-related disability, as well as improving stroke literacy among minority populations in New York .
  2. To develop a health disparities research and education/ training program that will train and mentor the next generation of minority investigators with interest in stroke disparities research.
  3. To advance stroke disparities research by evaluating the implementation of innovative solutions and culturally tailored approaches targeted at prevention of recurrent stroke among Black and Hispanic stroke survivors, across the continuum of stroke care.

   

 

Title: Patient-Reported Experiences of Discrimination in care took (PreDict)

Funding Source: National Institute of Minority Health and Health Disparities

Key Staff:

·         PI –Marcella Nunez-Smith, MD, Yale University

·         Subcontract PI - Jeanne Teresi, EdD, PhD

Research demonstrates patient-reported healthcare discrimination is significantly associated with low cancer screening rates, low adherence rates, low overall satisfaction rates and delays in seeking needed healthcare.  This project hopes to address substantial gaps in the emerging field of patient-reported healthcare discrimination.

A1. Apply advanced psychometric approaches to finalize items for inclusion on the Patient-Reported Experiences of Discrimination in Care Tool (PreDict) (n=20 hospitals across three states; target n= 6000 patients).

A2. Conduct between-hospital comparisons of PreDict performance and analyze patient-level data to identify associations between reported healthcare discrimination and self-reported outcomes.

A3. Determine the association between hospital-level performance on PreDict and performance on publicly-reported hospital quality measures.

     

Home